Departments & Subjects

Our mission is to work with parents and the local community to provide a broad curriculum and a creative approach to learning. Our intent is to enable all students to fulfil their unique potential and make the world a better place through their informed choices and actions.

Our curriculum meets the requirements of national guidelines and explicitly intends to support students to become :
SCHOLARLY
LITERATE
NUMERATE
SAFE
RESILIENT
REFLECTIVE
INDEPENDANT
COLLABORATIVE
CREATIVE
PASSIONATE
ACHIEVER
AMBITIOUS
OUTWARD-LOOKING
TOLERANT
UNDERSTANDING

 

English

Mrs Preston

English Department

“Yet language, as we are all aware, is a human birthright.”

Stephen Fry

 

Intent:

In the English department we are passionate about equipping pupils with literacy skills for life.  We aim to encourage debate and discussion, promote a love of reading and develop independent and critical thinking.  We believe that providing a rich and varied diet of reading across our literary heritage will enable pupils to understand our culture and the world around them.  We seek to inspire pupils by reading and emulating the work of wordsmiths from our literary canon – from great novelists and poets to skilful orators.  Effective communication in both spoken and written form lies at the heart of our subject.  We believe that by promoting discussion and collaboration our pupils can take their place as effective communicators in the wider world.

English Language KS5

English Language & English Literature KS 5

KS5    Edexcel A Level English Language

Year 12:

Half term Curriculum focus Landmark assessment
Autumn 1 Introduction to English Language – study of key frameworks including context, graphology, phonology, lexis/semantics and grammar.  

 

Extended response comparing 2 texts

Autumn 2 Introduction to Child Language Acquisition – focusing on how children acquire speech and theories of language acquisition

 

Introduction to Language and Identity – students will study how writers/speakers use language to convey their persona

Spring 1 Child Language Acquisition – revision of stages and theories.

 

Students will study how children develop literacy skills.

 

Students will continue to study how language is used to shape identity in written and spoken texts.

Year 12 mock exam

 

Spring 2 Poetry anthology – students will continue studying poems focusing on imagery, structure and theme and comparison between poems. Essay question comparing poems.
Summer 1 Revision for Language and Identity paper

 

Revision for Child Language Acquisition paper

Year 12 mock exam

 

Year 12 mock exam

Summer 2 Introduction to coursework – guided study of different genres for coursework.

 

Introduction to Language Variation – overview of the development of English Language over time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 13:

Half term Curriculum focus Landmark assessment
Autumn 1 Child Language Acquisition – revision of how children acquire speech

 

Language and Identity – revision of key frameworks and linguistic terms to support comparison of texts

 

 

Coursework – Crafting Language – students choose their own genre of writing to produce 2 pieces of writing for different audiences

 

 

Language Variation – students will study the key historical periods of development in English and key features that have changed over time.

End of year 12 assessment

 

End of year 12 assessment

 

 

 

First draft of coursework

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn 2 Coursework – Crafting Language – revision and editing of coursework by students

 

Language Variation and Identity

Final draft of coursework

 

 

Essay question comparing 2 texts from different periods/writers

Spring 1 Child Language Acquisition – revision of how children develop literacy skills

 

Coursework – Crafting Language – planning and writing a commentary

 

Language Investigation Study – students choose an area based on pre-release topics set by the board

Essay question from past paper

 

Draft of commentary completed

Spring 2 Language Variation and Identity – students use past papers to put analytical skills into practice

 

Coursework – Crafting Language – students produce final version of commentary to accompany coursework

Essay questions completed

 

 

 

Completed commentary submitted for coursework

Summer 1 Revision for A Level Exams Past paper questions
Summer 2 Revision for A Level exams Terminal exams completed

 

 

 

 

 

English Language & Literature KS3

Implementation:

KS3

Pupils’ transition to Key Stage 3 in English will ensure they maintain the key skills in writing and reading comprehension from Key Stage 2.  Pupils will develop their ability to respond to texts as critical thinkers using the key reading skills of inference, deduction and evaluation. They will also develop their understanding of critical writing.

Year 7:

Half term Curriculum focus Landmark assessment
Autumn 1 Students complete a letter writing task to introduce themselves to their teacher.

 

Students study the novel ‘Trash’ and explore how characters are presented, language and structural features.

 

Students explore a range of myths to understand the structure and archetypes of stories.

Benchmark written assessment

 

 

A written response to class reader – comprehension or WHW response

 

 

A written comprehension response to a myth.

 

 

Autumn 2 Students are introduced to the theme of class and injustice in the world of Victorian Britain through extracts from Dickens and non-fiction writers.

 

Students explore autobiographical writing on the theme of childhood memories through reading various extracts from writers including Roald Dahl and Maya Angelou.

A written response to a non-fiction

extract or a piece of creative writing.

 

 

 

A reading assessment analysing an extract of autobiographical writing.

Half term Curriculum focus Landmark assessment
Spring 1 Students study the theme of conflict through poetry and prose extracts.

 

A WHW response to ‘The Sentry’ by Wilfred Owen.
Spring 2 All Year 7 students explore the features of mystery and detective fiction including the work of Conan Doyle.

 

 

 

 

 

Students read extracts of a Victorian text – ‘Alice in Wonderland’

 

A reading assessment based on ‘The Speckled Band’

 

Creative writing – own description creating tension/suspense in response to an extract from ‘The Woman in White’

 

 

A reading assessment of an extract from ‘Alice in Wonderland’

 

A recount activity based on the novel – writing a newspaper article

 

Summer 1 All students prepare for Year 7 examination revising key skills.

 

 

All students study writing about famous explorers in non-fiction and fiction texts.

 

Year 7 written examination.

 

 

 

A written response – writing to argue/persuade and writing to describe.

 

Summer 2 Students to gain an introduction to studying Shakespeare at KS3 through studying different extracts from different Shakespeare plays.

 

 

 

Students to complement their study of Shakespearean English with learning about the history of the English Language.

 

Analysis of how language is used in an extract from ‘Hamlet’.

 

A piece of writing in character – a soliloquy as Lady Macbeth or Macbeth.

 

 

Reading comprehension of ‘Beowulf’.

 

Re-tell story of ‘Beowulf’ in prose from perspective of Grendel.

 

 

Co-Curricular: Some students have the opportunity to attend a session with a visiting story-teller.  All students participate in the House Spelling Bee in the autumn term.

Year 8:

Half term Curriculum focus Landmark assessment
Autumn 1 Gothic fiction – students study a range of short stories from Gothic fiction to understand key features of ghost story genre.

 

 

 

 

 

Travel writing – students study a range of non-fiction texts on the theme of travel to understand different perspectives and narrative voices.

Reading assessment exploring how writer creates suspense.

 

Writing assessment – own opening to a ghost story.

 

Writing assessment – review of a trip/holiday.

 

Autumn 2 Shakespeare – students study a comedy such as ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ to understand dramatic characterisation.

 

 

Media – students study a media-based unit exploring how a director creates tension/suspense in a film.

Reading assessment exploring how a character/theme is portrayed in the play.

 

Reading assessment exploring how tension/suspense is created in several scenes.

Spring 1 Non-fiction extracts on topical issues.

 

Beginner’s Guide – persuasive writing on a topic of the students’ choice.

 

 

Written guide to inform advise reader.

 

Spring 2 Novel ‘Trash’ – students will study how characters are presented and language/structural features

 

Freedom Writers –

 

 

 

Reading assessment in response to an extract

 

 

 

Summer 1 Poetry from Other Cultures – students study the craft of different writers and start to compare texts.

 

Autobiographical Writing – extracts from Maya Angelou

 

 

Reading assessment comparing 2 poems.

 

 

Writing assessment – recount of a memorable event.

 

 

Summer 2 Exam Preparation – reading practice of non-fiction extracts.

 

 

 

Science Fiction – students study key features of this genre and how the writer engages the reader.

Reading assessment comparing writers’ viewpoints.

 

 

Writing assessment – to produce own section of a science fiction story.

 

 

 

Co-Curricular:

English Language & Literature KS4

 

KS4 – Examination Board AQA – GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature (separate qualifications)

In the English department we see Year 9 English as a foundation year for GCSE – we will develop key skills and start to read and prepare some GCSE texts. All of the skills taught and the assessments completed are very much in line with GCSE work.

Year 9:

Half term Curriculum focus Landmark assessment
Autumn 1 Modern prose text: ‘Of Mice and Men’ by John Steinbeck

Students will explore how characters are presented and the significance of the context of the novel – 1930s America.

 

Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives in non-fiction

Students will use practice examination material to explore how writers convey the different attitudes to a common theme such as the issue of child labour in Victorian era compared to today.

 

Essay question analysing how a character is presented by the author

 

 

 

Practice GCSE examination paper to be completed with teacher support in class

Autumn 2 19th century novel: ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens (possible GCSE set text)

Students will explore how the key character is presented and Dickens’ message in writing the novel.

 

Explorations in creative writing

Students will describe a character/setting

 

Essay question responding to an extract from the text

 

 

 

Piece of creative writing in response to a picture based on GCSE practice paper

Spring 1 Non-fiction writing: campaign

Students will develop skills in writing to argue/persuade by researching a topical issue and studying speeches by famous orators.

Explorations in creative reading: Paper 1

Students will use practice examination material to develop understanding of how writers use language to convey their point of view

 

Piece of creative writing – the text of a campaign speech

 

 

Practice examination questions completed in class

Spring 2 An Introduction to Unseen Poetry

Students will study a range of poems and develop skills in understanding how poets use language and poetic form to convey their message.

Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives in non-fiction

Students will use practice examination material to evaluate how writers convey their opinions.

Written response to a poem

 

 

 

Written response evaluating how writers have conveyed their opinions

Summer 1 Shakespeare: ‘Romeo and Juliet’ (set text for English Literature)

Students will be introduced to the plot and characters of the play developing understanding of their characteristics.

Spoken Language

Students will prepare a presentation to the class on a topic of their choice to build confidence in oral and presentation skills.

 

Essay question responding to an extract from the text

 

 

Spoken Language Assessment – Pass, Merit or Distinction

Summer 2 Anthology Poetry: Power and Conflict cluster (set text for English Literature)

Students will study a range of war poems from the anthology focusing on poets use language and poetic form to convey their message.

Written response to an individual poem analysing language and structure.

 

Co-Curricular:

 

 

 

 

Year 10:

Half term Curriculum focus Landmark assessment
Autumn 1 Creative Writing – students will study how to engage the reader using imagery/a motif such as light and darkness.

 

An Inspector Calls – students will study how characters are presented including dramatic characterisation.

Extended response to a picture stimulus.

 

 

Extended response to a character/theme in the play.

 

Autumn 2 Spoken Language – students will plan and present a talk giving their opinions.

 

Romeo and Juliet – students will read key scenes as a class and focus on plot, character development and the theme of conflict.

Presentation to class graded using GCSE criteria – pass, merit, distinction.
Spring 1 Romeo and Juliet – students will explore the theme of conflict in the play as a whole.

 

 

English Language Paper 2 – students will practise key reading skills for non-fiction extracts – summarising information, analysing language and comparing writers’ opinions.

Essay question responding to an extract from the text.

 

Year 10 mock examination paper.

 

 

Spring 2 English Language Paper 2 – students will study opinion writing and emulate opinionated writers

 

Unseen poetry – students will explore strategies for how to study poems not ‘seen’ before the examination.

 

Extended response – writing to argue/persuade.

 

Extended response to a poem.

Summer 1 Power and Conflict poetry – students will study key war poems from the anthology.

 

English Language Paper 1 – students will practise key reading skills in reading fiction – analysing language and structure, evaluating opinions.

 

 

 

Year 10 mock examination paper (after half-term)

Summer 2 English Language Paper 1 – students will study how to approach creative writing with a picture stimulus.

 

Power and Conflict poetry – students will compare poems with a similar theme.

Year 10 mock examination paper.

 

 

Extended response comparing 2 poems.

 

Co-Curricular:

 

 

 

Year 11:

Half term Curriculum focus Landmark assessment
Autumn 1 An Inspector Calls – students will study how characters are presented including dramatic characterisation.

 

 

Essay question based on a character/theme.

 

Year 11 mock exam in autumn 2.

Autumn 2 English Language Paper 1 – students will revise key reading skills in reading fiction – analysing language and structure, evaluating opinions.

 

Unseen poetry – students will revise how to tackle unseen poems including comparison.

 

Year 11 mock exam

 

 

 

 

Year 11 mock exam

Spring 1 English Language Paper 2 – students will revise key reading skills for non-fiction extracts – summarising information, analysing language and comparing writers’ opinions. Students will also revise how to engage the reader in writing to argue/persuade. Year 11 mock exam
Spring 2 Romeo and Juliet – students will revise key characters and themes.

 

Power and Conflict – students will revise poems and compare texts.

Essay question based on an extract.

 

Essay question comparing 2 poems.

Summer 1 An Inspector Calls – students will revise key characters and themes. Essay question from past paper.

 

Summer 2 Revision of set texts and practice exam papers for English Language. GCSE examinations

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aims:
  • To promote an interest in reading and literature including texts from the literary canon such as Shakespeare.
  • To develop students’ reading comprehension and textual analysis of both fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • To enable students to write for different purposes and audiences.
  • To enable students to produce clearly structured and technically accurate written work.
  • To develop confidence in oral work so students express their opinions in formal, standard English.
Key assessment details:

In Years 9 and 10 students will be assessed regularly using GCSE examination-style tasks. There will be formal assessments at the end of each unit of work. In Year 10, students will sit a past GCSE English Language paper. Students will also complete a formal speaking and listening assessment involving a presentation to the class for their spoken language award; this is assessed by classroom teachers. In the autumn term of Year 11, students will sit a formal mock examination based on past papers in English Language and English Literature. Students will also practise essay writing skills through regular extended responses to exam style questions and examination set texts.

Media Studies

Media Studies can be taken as a GCSE option subject, with study beginning from Year 9. The Media Studies course enables students to pursue a range of academic interests and disciplines within the scope of a subject that is of increasing relevance to the world we live in. In learning about forms of mass communication, students are encouraged to draw on their existing experience of the media and to develop their abilities to analyse, as well as to create their own media products.

Aims
  • To increase ‘media literacy’ and to provoke meaningful questions about the influence of the media world, as experienced on a day-to-day basis.
  • To study across a range of different Media including broadcasting forms like TV, Video Games and Music Video, Online forms and Print Forms.
  • To provide extensive and meaningful coverage of media theory and up-to-date media practice and technologies.
  • To use creativity to produce media products based on the application of media theories and concepts.
  • To provide opportunities to learn about real media products and industries.

 

Content:
Year 9
Year 10
Year 11
  • Students are introduced to the world of the media and are encouraged to consider the impact it has on the modern world.
  • Continuing from Year 10, students are taught a range of more complex theories about Audience and Media Language.
  • Students practise analysing ‘unseen’ sources using the four key concepts.
  • They learn to analyse a range of media texts using the key concepts underpinning the subject- Media Language, Audience, Representation and Institutions.
  • During the course of the year, students produce their own media text in response to a brief presented by the exam board, AQA.
  • Students study a range of ‘close-study products’ to enable them to respond to Paper 1 and 2 of the GCSE Media examination.
  • During the first year of study, particular focus is given to TV and Film openings, music videos, film and advertising.
  • Students revise key theories, terms and concepts in preparation for their final GCSE examination.

 

Assessment:

Paper 1 Examination (1 hr 30 min)– 35% of total marks. The exam will include a mixture of multiple choice questions, short answer questions and one extended response question assessing breadth of knowledge and in-depth knowledge of the media. Part of the exam will involve analysis of both an unseen media text and texts studied in advance of the examination.

Paper 2 Examination (1hr 30 Min)- 35% of total marks. This exam focuses on textual analysis and will include a mixture of multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions. Students have to draw upon their knowledge of the ‘close-study products’ they will have studied during year 10 and 11.

Non-Examination Assessment–30% of total marks

Students complete a ‘Practical Production’ piece that is linked to a contemporary media issue.